Retrieval Conference and Evaluation Workshop

Monday, June 13, 2011 - 5:00am to Tuesday, June 14, 2011 - 11:30am
Purpose
The purpose of the conference was to share information and develop knowledge about engaged learning, civic engagement, and psychosocial well-being of students, and about what happens when colleges implement initiatives for strengthening their relationships. Participants brought empirical evidence, based upon research or evaluation, which addresses the guiding questions of the conference.
 
Guiding Questions
The agenda was organized around a series of guiding questions which reflect the objectives of the national project and those who participate in the conference, for example:
  • What are the relationships among the engaged learning, civic engagement, and social well-being of students?
  • What happens when college and universities try to implement institutional changes that strengthen each of these elements, and the relationships among them? What would it take to strengthen each element and their relationships?
  • What empirical evidence is available from research or evaluation, and what might be learned from it?
  • If we wanted to advance this work as a field of practice and subject of study at the institutional or national levels, what would be required?
Design
The conference was collegial and participatory in its design. Each session opened with a few provocative words by one or two participants, followed by vigorous small-group and whole group discussions.
 
 
Pre-Conference Evaluation Workshop 
The conference was preceded by an evaluation workshop facilitated by Ashley Finley, National Evaluator of BTtoP and Senior Director of Assessment and Research at AAC&U. The interactive workshop engaged participants in creating program-based assessment maps that can be expanded to include institutional outcomes. This strategy was intended to help both to more meaningfully assess program outcomes and to bring programmatic emphases from margin to center by aligning outcomes with institutional foci. Participants worked together to develop these maps, commonly referred to as logic models, to gain greater insight into the resources, processes, and range of outcomes needed to more widely engage campus constituencies in assessment efforts.
 
Conference Program with Audio
 
Saturday, October 06, 2012 5:15 AM
Monday, June 13, 1:30 p.m.
What are the relationships among the engaged learning, civic engagement, and psychosocial well-being of students? What is the evidence?
Joyce Bylander, Special Assistant to the President for Institutional and Diversity Initiatives, Dickinson College; Thia Wolf, Director of First Year Experience Program, Cal State, Chico; Peter Levine, Director of Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement (CIRCLE), Tufts University
 
Saturday, October 06, 2012 5:19 AM
Monday, June 13, 4:30 p.m.
What are the relationships between engaged learning and the psychosocial well-being of students, and vice versa? What benefits derive from their relationships at colleges and universities, and from expressing this as part of the core educational mission?
Kathy Low, Professor of Psychology, Bates College; Joan Riley, Assistant Professor of Nursing, Georgetown University; Andrew Wiemer, Director of Leadership and Volunteer Services, Drury University
 
Saturday, October 06, 2012 5:23 AM
Corey Keyes, Associate Professor of Sociology, Emory University
 
Saturday, October 06, 2012 5:27 AM
Tuesday, June 14, 8:45 a.m.
What are the relationships between civic engagement and the psychosocial well-being of students, and vice versa? What benefits derive from strengthening their relationships on the campus? Why should we, or anyone, care?
Michelle Boyd, Ph.D candidate, Tufts University; Cass Freedland, Director of Center for Leadership and Service, Wagner College; Richard Kendrick, Director of Institute for Civic Engagement and Professor of Sociology, SUNY-Cortland
 
Saturday, October 06, 2012 5:35 AM
Tuesday, June 14, 12:45 p.m.
What happens when college and universities try to implement changes that build relationships among engaged learning, civic engagement and student psychosocial well-being? What are some strategies for strengthening each of these elements and the connections among them?
Ashley Finley, National Evaluator, BTtoP, Senior Director of Assessment and Research, AAC&U; Phyllis Lane, Dean of Student and Academic Support Services, Evergreen State College; Nancy Mitchell, Director of General Education, University of Nebraska; Jack Ryan, Vice Provost, Gettysburg College