2015-2017

Category 1: Well-Being Seminar Grant

Goucher College has a long, rich civic history, and has been dedicated to engaging in thoughtful curricular and co-curricular community-based work for many years, including social justice and activism on local, national, and international issues. This has particularly been true for students of color, as the national conversation around racism and its structural role in higher education has become an important exchange for all college campuses. Student activism has pushed institutions to be more reflective on their structures, and to increase the commitment to social justice and equity. Yet, students of color continue to experience greater emotional and psychological turmoil than their majority group counterparts. How do we help students develop a more nuanced understanding of themselves, especially in terms of their psycho-social well-being, during these times of great emotional stress? How do we help students achieve the right balance between their academic work and their rich co-curricular life, particularly as student activists?

Category 1: Well-Being Seminar Grant

Whitman College proposes to host a seminar to engage in productive dialog faculty and staff who work with first-generation students, in order to enhance communication, coordinate activities, and develop a cohesive set of initiatives that promote the well-being of first-generation students and ensure that they have a satisfying, comprehensive educational experience at Whitman.

Category 1: Well-Being Seminar Grant

The Longhorn Center for Community Engagement (LCCE) in the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement (DDCE) at The University of Texas at Austin (UT-Austin) is planning an April seminar to showcase the community collaborations of students, faculty, community partners, and city staff in a single neighborhood, Rundberg, of Austin, a city that is experiencing simultaneous rapid growth and gentrification. We seek funding to provide space and time for stakeholders of community engagement projects in Rundberg to dialogue among themselves and with other instructors, students, partners, and city officials about best practices for building mutually beneficial partnerships and to discuss possible further community collaborations in Austin that promote the well-being of students and of community. The tentative title for this seminar is Collaborating for Well-Being: Successes in Rundberg and Beyond.

Category 1: Well-Being Seminar Grant

The purpose of this seminar is to create a Community of Inclusive Excellence Instruction that is focused on practicing inclusive excellence in the classroom. It brings together instructors from our three teaching groups on campus – faculty instructors, graduate student lecturers, and undergraduate teaching assistants – to learn from each other’s institutional experience of excellence; to develop each other’s professional practice on how to make excellence inclusive; and to rededicate themselves as practitioners of inclusivity on a predominantly white and affluent campus. By connecting them to each other and to campus resources, the seminar will prepare our instructors to model inclusive excellence as the people who practice it for personal well-being; to evidence inclusive excellence in the courses that implement it as a strategy of student success; and to prioritize inclusive excellence in the institution that acknowledges it as the foundation of its mission.

Category 1: Well-Being Seminar Grant

The purpose of this seminar is to generate dialogue regarding creating opportunities for well-being within learning experiences at SFU and expand the network of Faculty involved in the project. The seminar will build upon Simon Fraser University's Well-being in Learning Environments project, that was originally developed with the support of a grant from Bringing Theory to Practice. It will further explore opportunities for creating conditions for well-being while engaging additional faculty members to become involved. Faculty who are already active in creating conditions for well-being in learning environments will showcase examples from their teaching practice and will invite dialogue and discussion among participants to generate and share new ideas for advancing this work. In particular, participants will explore how teaching practices and policies can contribute to the creation of conditions for well-being in learning environments, and will explore the benefits this can have on instructors’ and students’ personal development and learning.

Category 1: Well-Being Seminar Grant

The goal of this seminar is to create a task force to come to a collaborative definition of community engagement that promotes the well-being of students, staff and faculty and to develop a plan of action for coordinating and tracking service-learning and community service. The task force will research the connection between well-being and community engagement, examine existing efforts and conduct small group seminars with campus constituent groups and the community, culminating in an open presentation of results.

Category 1: Well-Being Seminar Grant

The campus-wide seminar “Exploring Purpose, Fostering Purposefulness” will bring together faculty and staff to exchange ideas about how to support student purposefulness at Hagerstown Community College (HCC). More than half of HCC’s students are first-generation, higher than the community-college average. While most community college students intend to earn an associate degree and to transfer to a four-year institution, most do not achieve that outcome. The seminar grant will support a pair of workshops for faculty and staff a) to promote dialogue about the purpose of college, and b) to identify effective ways to help students find and maintain a purposeful orientation that will allow them to persist and succeed.

Category 1: Well-Being Seminar Grant

Gettysburg College respectfully requests a seminar grant to renew campus conversations on first-year advising in ways that encourage all students to flourish during their time on campus.

Category 1: Well-Being Seminar Grant

Georgia Gwinnett College (GGC), an access institution located in the most ethnically diverse county in Georgia, proposes to host a seminar for the GGC community that aims to celebrate diversity, encourage social awareness, and speak openly about identity issues, including the common political rhetoric “fear of otherness”. By providing safe spaces, the project team aspires for the GGC community to openly discuss their fear of otherness – an issue that may lead to misunderstanding of the unknown - and the ways in which such fear influences their sense of security, thus contributing to the well-being of the college community.

Category 1: Well-Being Seminar Grant

This faculty learning community, comprised of engaged faculty from across California State University Fullerton’s many colleges, will study and recommend how mentoring practices can be more effectively used to foster faculty well-being at CSUF. Well-chosen, institutionally responsive mentoring practices are vital tools for supporting the well-being of faculty so they can maximize their role in creating and maintaining an engaged culture for learning at CSUF. Mentoring is an important tool for supporting several elements of faculty well-being, including personal identity and fulfillment, as well as social awareness and development. This faculty learning community will reinvigorate past campus discussion of faculty mentoring in light of both current research and the university’s strategic commitment to retaining a diverse faculty.

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